Our Strategy

We are an independent research hub at WWF catalysing new ideas to solve environmental challenges that require a range of scientific expertise to bring science to action.

Our vision, mission, goal and values

 

OUR VISION

Strong connections between science policy and practice lead to effective conservation outcomes.

OUR MISSION

We are an independent research hub catalysing new ideas to solve environmental challenges that require a range of scientific expertise. As a member of the WWF Global Network, we bring science to action.

OUR GOAL AND OBJECTIVES

By 2020, the Luc Hoffmann Institute is a leader in conservation science providing evidence-based recommendations to improve the interface between science, policy and practice by::

  • Conducting collaborative research to improve conservation outcomes;
  • Magnifying the impact of our work through innovative engagement;
  • Fostering the capacity to connect science and conservation delivery in the regions that need it most.

OUR VALUES

We are innovative, accountable, inclusive and transparent. Strong governance and clear accountability underpin all our activities.

Our theory of change

Our research is collaborative. We magnify our impact. We build the long-term capacity of young conservation scientists in developing countries where this capacity is needed most.

Our theory of change, illustrated in Figure 1, asserts:

  • Civil society organizations such as WWF can have greater impact with the science they bring to bear on conservation challenges when they work directly with science communities.[1]
  • Scientific research is more likely to be applied when policy and practice experts, and decision-makers help set the research focus and are part of the research process.[2]
  • Research will respond more effectively to conservation needs when scientists are empowered to engage directly with targeted audiences.
Figure 1: The Luc Hoffmann Institute theory of change starts with the barriers to delivering evidence-driven solutions, articulates a series of actions to overcome these barriers, and shows how our core activities and outputs result in better conservation outcomes.

Figure 1: The Luc Hoffmann Institute theory of change starts with the barriers to delivering evidence-driven solutions, articulates a series of actions to overcome these barriers, and shows how our core activities and outputs result in better conservation outcomes.

Our theory of change is built on two assumptions:

  1. Collaborative solutions will have greater impact on conservation decision-making than solutions developed by policy and practice experts working without scientists, and vice versa.
  2. Research will have greater impact on conservation outcomes if it is conducted in collaboration with decision-makers and connected to decision-making processes. This assertion underpins our close association with WWF and its partners.

Our objectives and indicators

Objective 1: Conduct collaborative research to improve conservation outcomes

By 2016, all Luc Hoffmann Institute collaborative research projects develop publications, tools, methods and relationships within 1 year of project completion.
Outcome:

    High-quality transdisciplinary body of co-produced knowledge addresses critical conservation challenges.

Objective 2: Magnify the impact of our work through innovative engagement

By 2020, all completed projects have been developed to meet a need identified by conservation policy makers or practitioners and the results have been disseminated to the WWF network, relevant civil society organisations, policy makers and practitioners.
Outcome:

    New relationships, networks and partnerships provide a platform to support future research and conservation action.

Objective 3: Foster the capacity needed to connect science and
conservation delivery in the regions that need it most

By 2020, Luc Hoffmann Institute research projects and processes have strengthened individual capacity to connect science and conservation delivery.
Outcome:

    Luc Hoffmann Institute Fellows and staff have unique capacity to connect conservation science and delivery built within the WWF network and other core partners of the Luc Hoffmann Institute.

References

[1] Tewksbury, J., & Wagner, G. (2014). The role of civil society in recalibrating conservation science incentives. Conservation Biology: The Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology, 28(5), 1437–1439.

[2] Mauser, W., Klepper, G., Rice, M., Schmalzbauer, B. S., Hackmann, H., Leemans, R., & Moore, H. (2013). Transdisciplinary global change research: the co-creation of knowledge for sustainability. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 5(3–4), 420–431.

Download our strategy in PDF format.

What is conservation science?

Conservation science is an interdisciplinary field that recognises tight connections between ecosystems and social systems. It draws on a broad array of social and biophysical science disciplines and focuses on conserving ecosystems and biodiversity while enhancing human well-being.

Kareiver, P. and Marvier, M. (2012). What is conservation science? Bioscience, Vol 62(11):962-962

Main image: Olive ridley sea turtle hatchling (Lepidochelys olivacea) on its way to the sea. They orient themselves by the brightness of the horizon above the ocean, Ostional beach, Costa Rica. Photo © naturepl.com / Solvin Zankl / WWF

Chris JohnsonOur Strategy