Luc Hoffmann Institute

Future-proofing Colombia’s protected areas

“This project has been an invitation to think differently about protected areas – it can continue to be a powerful tool for the management of protected areas anywhere in the world.” These were the words of Luis Germán Naranjo, Conservation Director, WWF Colombia during the final leadership meeting of a Luc Hoffmann Institute project that

Realistic restoration – addressing stakeholder values

Countries have made ambitious commitments to restore vegetation on degraded land in the coming years. These include large-scale restoration projects such as the Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact and the United Nations Billion Trees Campaign. Careful planning and clear objectives are needed to ensure restoration projects can achieve their targets with the funds allocated but they

Understanding the science, policy and practice interface

Improving the relationships between science, policy and practice has been described as one of the critical challenges for sustainable development in the 21st century. The Luc Hoffmann Institute is one of a growing number of organisations seeking to transform conservation by building stronger relationships between these fields. It believes that collaborative research and decision making

New horizons: Luc Hoffmann Institute annual report 2016-2017

The institute can be a unifying force, pulling all the vital pieces together – the knowledge, experience and passion of all those already working hard to save the natural world but see their impact limited, and all those who can offer resources but want their investment to have maximum effect. Keep an eye on the

Global study of children: More trees, less disease

A global study says children living in river basins whose watersheds have greater tree cover are less likely to experience diarrhoeal disease, the second leading cause of death for children under the age of five. Published in Nature Communications today, the University of Vermont-led study, supported by the Luc Hoffmann Institute, is the first to quantify the