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past projects

Development corridors partnership

Project end date: November 2018

Who we are working with

Related SDGS

About the project

The Development Corridors Partnership, led by the UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) is helping countries in East Africa to plan for a sustainable future.

The project will use a capacity-building approach to analyse proposed development corridors in Kenya and Tanzania and consider how they can be designed to deliver sustainable, inclusive and resilient economic growth.

Initial corridors are the Lamu Port and Lamu – Southern Sudan – Ethiopia Transport Corridor (LAPSSET Kenya) and the Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania (SAGCOT). Further corridors are likely to be considered by the project, including the corridor being created by building the Standard Gauge Railway in Kenya, and two development corridors in Uganda.

The project has three main objectives:

  • Capacity building including training for researchers and institutions in East Africa, UK and China to build a group of experienced and knowledgeable practitioners that will be able to support more sustainable land use and investment planning in East Africa and beyond.
  • Cross-disciplinary research to enhance the relevance and quality of research on development corridors. The project will link the research done in eastern Africa to the work of Chinese research institutions who advise on Chinese development spending in Africa. By increasing knowledge of the issues and opportunities associated with development corridors in Africa, investment activities can be designed to be more socially and environmentally sustainable.
  • New and existing research will be shared with a range of decision makers involved in development corridor planning including government, private sector actors, Chinese investors and lending agencies. This will ensure those involved in planning and implementing corridor visions can make evidence-based and informed decisions.  

Working with WCMC, the Luc Hoffmann Institute will contribute expertise on convening, research design and mapping policy pathways, aiming to accelerate the outcomes and influence of the research. The overall goal is to maximise the project’s potential impact on policy making for sustainable socio-economic development in East Africa and capitalise on this critical moment for the future of conservation and society in the region. 

Related resources

A measure to make biodiversity relevant

An environmental visionary, The Luc Hoffmann Institute’s patron and WWF’s father

And the cities rise up? – Reflections from Habitat III

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past projects

Managing biodiversity risks in global supply chains

Developing new methods to assess the biodiversity impact of agricultural commodities such as palm oil and soy.

Contacted: Managing Biodiversity Risks in Global Supply Chains

The challenge

Agricultural commodities such as palm oil and soy are closely associated with biodiversity loss and habitat degradation. These commodities feature in the supply chains of countless companies and are embedded within both food and non-food products of global economic importance.

Business and governments increasingly recognise the need to manage the negative impacts on biodiversity but so far, there are no globally valid methods or tools available to identify and link risks and impacts to specific supply chains, products or actors. Linking end products to their biodiversity impact can help the public and private sector make decisions that reduce that impact.

The response

Starting with the Cerrado system in Brazil, the Contacted project in which the Luc Hoffmann Institute is a partner is developing new methodologies to assess and measure the biodiversity impact of particular commodities. The work links entire supply chains – from consumers and traders to producers. It helps companies, governments and conservation practitioners understand and manage the biodiversity footprints of agricultural commodity production.

The project involves several WWF offices in promoting cross-scale research and engagement for supply chain transformation. The focus is between Brazil and Europe because large volumes of soy destined for Europe originate in Brazil, European companies have secured commitments for responsible soy and consumer awareness is most advanced there. However, sustainability in the soy supply chain, even in Europe, is believed by some to be facing a gridlock.

The impact

The research involves modelling the impacts of land use change on species and habitats and linking the impacts to local agricultural production systems and consumption activities through trade models. Contacted incorporates the values and perspectives of diverse stakeholders on how threats are perceived, experienced, and managed in order to stimulate innovation for sustainability.

Contacted brings key research institutions together to work with WWF offices to test how these approaches can be integrated as a decision-support tool in conservation and business practice.

The work on supply chain impacts will be integrated into Trase, a new online platform which lets companies, governments and others track flows of ‘forest-risk’ commodities from production landscapes to consumer markets. It will also be integrated into the work on soy sustainability of WWF Brazil and WWF US and the WWF Living Planet report. The project team is working with WWF’s Moore Foundation project under the Forest and Agriculture Markets Initiative to help transition soy and beef supply chains towards deforestation free.

Project partners

The Luc Hoffmann Institute has partnered with WWF-UK, Cambridge Conservation Initiative at the University of Cambridge, UNEP-WCMC, Sustainable Consumption and Production group at Stockholm Environmental Institute (SEI), the University of York, and Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science (CBCS) at the University of Queensland.

Project leaders

Malika Virah Sawmy (Luc Hoffmann Institute); Mike Barrett (WWF-UK); Toby Gardner, Chris West and Jon Green (SEI York); Neil Burgess and Paz Durán (WCMC); Andrew Balmford (University of Cambridge); Hugh Possingham, Duan Biggs, James Watson, Helen Ross and Angela Guerrero González (Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science at the University of Queensland).

Start date: July 2016

End date: April 2018

Related reading

The implementation crisis in conservation planning: could ‘mental models’ help?

Business-NGO partnerships in global value chains: part of the solution or part of the problem of sustainable change?

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past projects

Spatial mapping of Sustainable Development Goals

About the project

The issue

Establishing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with their long-overdue incorporation of environmental aspects alongside social and economic dimensions of sustainability, has sparked intense debate about the contributions of largely natural and restored terrestrial environments towards sustainability.

This debate is intensifying given the rapidly approaching deadline for the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and global thinking about what might replace it. The Paris Agreement under the UN climate change convention and the Land Degradation Neutrality target of the UN convention on desertification have added further momentum to the discussions.

There have been many attempts to conceptually map the various SDGs against each other, against the activities of different sectors, and against the human-environment landscape but there have been few attempts to map the SDGs’ spatial requirements so that the interactions and trade-offs between them can be assessed.

In particular, the spatial requirements of SDG 6 on clean freshwater have yet to be examined in any detail or compared to the spatial requirements of other SDGs. For example, upland catchments could be maintained as natural forest to support the goals on freshwater, carbon storage and biodiversity, or converted to agriculture to support the food security goal, or to carbon capture and storage to support the climate change goal.

Many areas of the world have many, sometimes conflicting, sometimes synergistic, values to society when viewed through the SDG lens. The spatial mapping of SDGs and their overlap has untapped potential to support sustainability efforts and may help overcome transboundary challenges to decisions over natural resource management.

Project goals

IUCN, Conservation International, UNEP-WCMC, King’s College London, The Nature Conservancy and WWF with support from the Luc Hoffmann Institute are testing different approaches to combining spatial information on agricultural potential, freshwater production from natural ecosystems, irrigation, carbon storage and sequestration, biodiversity and other important societal values. They will examine the contribution different approaches can make to SDG implementation, to the objectives of different environmental conventions and to setting land-use priorities.

The overall goal is to jointly develop proof-of-concept mapping approaches and guidance for testing within a wider community of SDG practitioners. If one (or more) of the approaches proves to be useful to this community, IUCN will seek to incorporate it into key processes in the run-up to 2030 when the current SDG mandate will be reassessed.

The first step will be to develop the scientific underpinnings of the broad approach to be taken. Which SDGs and values should be considered? What values should be considered and why? What spatial data will be used as proxies for these values and how closely do these map to the values being examined? What similar work has been done in the past and how much can this be built on?

For more information please contact:

Melanie Ryan, Senior Programme Manager, Luc Hoffmann Institute melryan@wwfint.org

Project partners

UNEP-WCMC, IUCN, Conservation International, King’s College London, The Nature Conservancy, WWF and the Luc Hoffmann Institute.

Related Reading

Mapping nature’s contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals, thought piece by Andrea Betancourt

On the sofa at World Water Week 2018: Experts explain how nature contributes to SDG 6 on water

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past projects

Sustainable soy and beef supply chains

About the project

The issue

Burgeoning global demand for commodities such as soy and beef is causing major changes in land use and threatening biodiversity. Producers, traders and other stakeholders need to understand the impacts and risks and develop solutions that will lead to sustainable supply chains. To achieve this, better tools are needed to assess these impacts and risks for specific supply chains, products and actors.

The project

A collaboration between the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, WWF, the Luc Hoffmann Institute and other partners aims to stop the loss and degradation of forests and other natural habitats caused by beef and soy production in the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado, and the Chaco region of Argentina and Paraguay. The project comes under the Moore Foundation forests and agricultural markets initiative and will contribute to an improved, shared understanding of biodiversity impacts within agricultural supply chains.

Through an earlier project called Contacted the Luc Hoffmann Institute has already helped develop new tools to help stakeholders assess the biodiversity impacts of soy and beef supply chains, starting with the Cerrado in Brazil. The new collaboration is integrating these tools with how stakeholders view deforestation-free supply chains and shared responsibilities for impacts.

Activities of the new collaboration include:

  • Disseminating the results of work undertaken by the Contacted project among key stakeholders.
  • Producing evidence of the different perceptions among supply chain actors on the opportunities and barriers to achieving deforestation-free supply chains.
  • Drawing on peer-reviewed scientific papers produced by Contacted to provide tailored insights for supply chain actors.
  • Supporting a research-policy framework for achieving deforestation-free agricultural supply chains.

Project partners

WWF, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundationthe Luc Hoffmann Institute.

Project leaders

Richard Gauld, Head of Operations, Luc Hoffmann Institute rgauld@wwfint.org or Malika Virah-Sawmy malikavs@gmail.com

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past projects

China national parks for people

Helping to balance economic development and environmental protection in China.

The challenge

Economic growth in China has relied on the consumption of natural resources which has led to widespread environmental degradation across the country. In recent years, providing access to clean water, safe food and fresh air – basic human needs – for the people of China’s megacities is becoming increasingly challenging.

China’s new ‘Beautiful China’ and ‘Ecological Civilisation’ concepts indicate that the nation’s leaders understand the challenge and want to balance economic development with environmental protection.

In November 2013, the Chinese government announced its intention to explore the establishment of a national park system, as part of its 13th five-year plan. These new national parks aim to improve nature conservation and provide benefits to people. But the current and biggest challenge to implementation is a technical one: where and how to draw these ecological ‘red lines’ to achieve this balance?

The response

The Luc Hoffmann Institute (LHI) China National Parks for People project has supported the new national park institutions and provided the latest knowledge to help guide their efforts. The project has linked research to policy in an opportune ‘policy window’ given China’s national drive to achieving its eco-civilisation vision.

The impact

The project has collaboratively produced a roadmap for ecosystem services governance in national parks that partners intend to use in forming new guidelines being established to manage the pilot phase of the new national park system.

Project partners

State Research Council (National Development Reform Committee), WWF, IUCN, Beijing Normal University, Luc Hoffmann Institute.

Project leaders

Dr Siyuan HE (LHI Fellow), Dr Wang Lei (WWF China), Prof. Su Yang (State Research Council, NDRC), Dr Cheng (Beijing Normal University), Dr Louise Gallagher (Geneva University).

Project development

The proposal was submitted in response to a call for projects to the WWF Network in early 2014. It was selected by the LHI team because of the window of opportunity to conduct research in support of a specific policy process.

Start date: September 2015
End date:   September 2017

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past projects

Assessing the performance of marine protected areas

Linking governance, conservation, ecosystem services, and human well being.

The challenge

The benefits and services provided by marine ecosystems, including fisheries, coastal protection and tourism, play an ever more critical role in the economies of many developing countries, supporting the livelihoods and food security of millions of people.

Marine protected areas (MPAs) which include marine reserves, sanctuaries, parks, and no-take zones, are areas designated to protect marine species and habitats from both global and local threats. They are expanding rapidly in number and total area. In 2011, 193 countries committed themselves to the Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Targets, including a goal of “effectively and equitably” managing 10% of their coastal and marine areas within MPAs and “other effective area-based conservation measures” by 2020.

As countries continue to expand their coverage and create new MPAs to achieve national targets, many unanswered questions remain: Are MPAs meeting their social and ecological objectives? Are they being managed “effectively and equitably”? How can we ensure that MPAs deliver the ecological and social benefits they were designed to produce?

The response

The Marine Protected Areas (MPA) project has compiled the first global data set to examine the links between MPA management and effectiveness. The research, a partnership between the Luc Hoffmann Institute (LHI) and the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), coordinated by LHI Fellow David Gill, identified the links between MPA governance and socio-ecological outcomes by compiling and analysing data from 589 MPAs across the globe. It brought together a group of researchers and stakeholders from multiple research disciplines as well as academic and non-academic backgrounds to highlight some of challenges affecting MPAs, mainly insufficient staffing and funding. These shortcomings were shown to significantly affect fish populations in the MPAs that were investigated.

The impact

The project found that at MPAs that had sufficient staffing, increases in fish populations were nearly three times greater than those without adequate personnel. Despite the critical role of local management capacity however, only 35% of MPAs reported acceptable funding levels and only 9% reported adequate staff to manage the MPA. These findings are essential for protected area managers, funders and policy-makers. They provide support for protected area managers who suffer, first hand, staffing and funding challenges and often feel that their tasks far exceed their capacity. The findings provide funders with a more accurate representation of what it takes to effectively manage a MPA. They can also help local, regional and even global policy-makers design and implement legislation on protected areas that considers the challenges presented.

The research proposes policy solutions including increasing investments in MPA management, prioritising social science research on MPAs, and strengthening methods for monitoring and evaluating MPAs.


Project partners

Luc Hoffmann Institute, SESYNC, WWF US, Conservation International.

Project leaders

David Gill (Luc Hoffmann/SESYNC Fellow), Helen Fox (National Geographic), Mike Mascia (Conservation International), Louise Glew and Gabby Ahmadia (WWF US).

Related Reading

Capacity shortfalls hinder the performance of marine protected areas globally

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past projects

Managing social & environmental trade-offs in African agriculture

About the project

The issue

Increasing agricultural production to meet rapidly growing demand for food while safeguarding vital ecosystem services and promoting social equality lies at the heart of sustainable development.

Yet research has shown that conflicts between Sustainable Development Goals on improving food security, reducing inequalities and ecosystem conservation are intensifying in Sub-Saharan Africa because of rapid economic development and population growth.

Current food and forest policies in the region often fail to recognise the links between agricultural development, biodiversity and ecosystems. This could result in many countries losing more than a third of their natural forests and much of their biodiversity with an impact on human well-being.

Current agricultural strategies are poorly informed by these trade-offs – particularly considering projected regional changes in climate and, in some areas, conflict with forest conservation and restoration policies. This can contribute to inequality and further marginalise communities who depend on agriculture or forests for a living.

The project

This collaboration between the Luc Hoffmann Institute and the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) aims to enhance the connections between science and policy to improve support for decision makers in Zambia, Ghana and Ethiopia. It will work to better understand and manage trade-offs between food production, conserving biodiversity and protecting natural assets without exacerbating social inequality.

The partnership will enhance the ongoing SENTINEL (Social and Environmental Trade-offs in African Agriculture) project, a research initiative led by IIED, supported by the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) of the UK Research Councils. SENTINEL is a partnership between 10 universities and research organisations in the UK and sub-Saharan Africa, working  in Ethiopia, Ghana and Zambia.

This project also helps connect research and learning from the Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAPP) Working Group on Food and Forests in Africa, an international expert group from 17 research, policy and practice organisations. It will ensure that these global convening and research efforts target policy and impact pathways for improved conservation outcomes, with three focus areas:

Learning and action from scenarios

Learning from the development of national-level scenarios to strengthen SENTINEL by engaging policy, practice and research stakeholders in exploring impacts and trade-offs in a ‘safe space’ and examining the strengths and limitations of this process for improving science-policy links.

Theory of change and policy influence

Design and facilitate a theory of change workshop that will underpin science-policy interactions and develop pathways for policy influence and change for the SENTINEL project and partners.

Identifying successful policy trade-offs

Develop a research programme that synthesises the key factors that underpin success (in reconciling competing food production and conservation objectives) and examines critical success factors in different settings.

Project aims include:

  • Connect and enhance the impact of these two international, interdisciplinary research initiatives to maximise the likelihood of science being used to inform critical decisions.
  • Undertake research using new interdisciplinary and knowledge co-production methods to improve the connections between knowledge and decision making in Ghana, Zambia and Ethiopia.
  • Develop a rigorous and systematic approach to research in understanding trade-offs and success for food, forests and biodiversity.
  • Allow for learning at the national and global level on how new approaches to development of future scenarios can be replicated and scaled up.
  • Develop shared communications and dissemination channels to enhance the profile and reach of the project outputs.

For more information please contact:
Melanie Ryan, Head of programme (interim), Luc Hoffmann Institute at Melryan@wwfint.org.

Project partners

IIED, the Luc Hoffmann Institute.

Related reading

What will it take to transform African agricultural policy? Thought piece by Melanie Ryan, Head of programme (interim), Luc Hoffmann Institute

Truly transformative change is key to combating the biodiversity crisis
Article from the International Institute for Environment and Development highlighting the SNAPP Research Programme on Food and Forest in Africa Working Group

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past projects

Future-proofing conservation in colombia

Helping people and ecosystems adapt to environmental change

The challenge

Protected areas such as national parks are key to helping communities and nature adapt to a changing climate. They build resilience to climate change globally, buffer the impacts of extreme climate events, underpin important ecosystem services such as food and water provision and protect biodiversity.

Maintaining healthy protected areas under climate change requires knowledge that is relevant, accessible and easily integrated into policy, planning and management.

The response

This Luc Hoffmann Institute project is developing methodologies to enable the adaptive management of protected areas so they can continue to support biodiversity conservation, local communities and economies into the future.

The project team works with Parques Nacionales Naturales de Colombia (Colombia National Parks) to develop interdisciplinary methods that connect projections of climate impacts with social science insights into policy and management challenges. This ‘futures thinking’ helps protected area planners and managers take decisions in the context of change and uncertainty.

Working in two pilot sites – the Amazon piedmont and the Otun watershed in the coffee growing region – the project aims to ensure that adaptation and the future expansion of the protected area network draws on the best available knowledge to maintain ecosystem services in the face of climate change.

The impact

The project has helped revise the criteria for the IUCN Green List Standard for Protected Areas, specifically by stressing the need to include adaptive governance indicators and mainstreaming climate considerations into the standard.

The project has also helped Parques Naturales Nacionales de Colombia (PNN) fulfil its commitments under the REDPARQUES declaration. REDPARQUES is a technical body consisting of public and private institutions and specialists from 18 member (Latin American) countries working in the realm of protected areas and wildlife. Its objective is to increase technological and management capacity, based on the exchange of experiences and knowledge among its members. Through the declaration, member countries recognise the important role of protected areas in mitigating and adapting to climate change.

The project’s methodology will be integrated into a Global Environment Facility (GEF)-funded project that aims to strengthen Colombia’s National System of Protected Areas. It will also serve as a tool to guide the effectiveness of protected area management, a major goal of the GEF project.

WWF Colombia will use one of the project’s methodologies – Protected Areas – Benefits Assessment Tools (PA-BAT) to assess management effectiveness. The PA-BAT is primarily designed to be used by protected area managers working with stakeholders to identify important values and benefits that protected areas bring. It is also possible that PA-BAT is implemented in the process of creating new protected areas in Colombia

The methodology and outputs have been key elements in the design of a Project Finance Strategy for National Parks of Colombia. This strategy resulted from an agreement and commitment from several NGOs working in Colombia including WWF Colombia, Wildlife Conservation Society and other local NGOs, as well as the Colombian Government, to build a financial strategy to strengthen the functioning of the country’s national parks for the next 30 years.

Relationship building has been a key component of this project – particularly between WWF Colombia and its partners, and Parques Nacionales (PNN). The relationship between Colombia and Australia has been bolstered through Claudia Munera, Conservation Futures Fellow, Lorrae van Kerkhoff of Australian National University (ANU) and Michael Dunlop of CSIRO presenting the project at the Colombian Embassy in Australia.

Other conservation and academic institutions in Colombia, including the Humboldt Institute and Javierana University have shown an interest in becoming more involved in the work.

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past projects

Watersheds and Human Health

Using Big Data to explore the links between watershed and human health

The challenge

Public health issues such as malnutrition, water-borne diseases and mental illness cause significant hardship and millions of deaths annually. Case studies and anecdotes indicate that trends in natural ecosystems and human health are related but we lack a rigorous understanding of how. In particular, the impact of watershed disturbance on water-borne disease is still poorly understood at a global level. A clearer picture of these links would help improve the health of some of the world’s poorest people while providing a human health case for conserving some of the most important landscapes and seascapes.

The response

The Watersheds and Human Health project, in which the Luc Hoffmann Institute is a partner, has tested a ‘big data’ approach to illustrate how the condition and management of watersheds affects human health. The project explores opportunities for the big data methodology for linking environment and health considerations in the management of WWF priority river basins. These insights will help improve the effectiveness of conservation investments by addressing a social dimension.

The project team has compiled, for the first time, the Demographic and Health Surveys administered for USAID over 20 years, covering over 500,000 households in more than 40 countries. They combined this data including on health problems like diarrhoea, stunting and anaemia as well as socio-economic factors like education, income and sanitation with information on protected areas, land cover, climate, and infrastructure to produce a unique global database.

The impact

This research will increase our understanding of how land management and conservation can affect human health. It will improve capacity to analyse environment and human health implications under the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Ultimately, the database will be made publicly available, along with examples of methods that can be used to analyse and estimate likely health impacts of projects proposed by WWF and others, demonstrating the potential value of conservation as a public health investment.

Project partners

Project leaders

Dr Taylor Ricketts (University of Vermont), Dr Brendan Fisher (University of Vermont), Dr Dave Tickner (WWF-UK), Dr Diego Herrera Garcia (EDF), Dr Ranaivo Rasolofoson (University of Vermont) and Dr Louise Gallagher (University of Geneva).

Project development

The original project concept was developed by Dr Taylor Ricketts (University of Vermont) with HEAL funding in collaboration with SESYNC.

Start date: 1 April 2015

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past projects

Navigating the nexus

Understanding the food and water trade-offs generated by hydropower development.

The challenge

The Mekong River basin is one of the richest areas of biodiversity in the world and home to some 60 million people who rely on the river system’s abundant resources for healthy, affordable nutrition and for their livelihood.

The health of this system is crucial to their future security, and to the economic development of the six countries that share the Mekong region: Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, China and Myanmar. With so much at stake, decisions about how best to manage the region’s natural resources and develop its economies need to be carefully made and driven by evidence.

Economic growth, social equity and national security depend on healthy ecosystems. Yet ecosystem health and the issues that policy-makers care most about, are rarely clearly connected. The result is that choices are often made without effective consideration of environmental consequences and this  can undermine progress towards achieving society’s goals.

By 2030, 88 hydropower dams will be built in the Mekong river system. Research suggests the scale of development will result in a net loss of fish protein available to local and international consumers of 23-38%.

The response

The Navigating the Nexus project in which the Luc Hoffmann Institute is a partner has provided new empirical information on these food-energy-water trade-offs (often referred to as the Nexus) and climate change impacts in the Mekong River basin.

Two important phases of work were completed in this two-year project. One was to establish a conceptual understanding of the food-energy-water nexus within the basin. The second was to explore the relatively overlooked connection between changing water availability and flow and the nutrition and livelihood impacts on vulnerable farmers in Cambodia and Vietnam.

The impact

Taking a case-study approach, this research has produced new evidence on the socio-economic impacts of high-yield rice production in the Mekong Delta and the consequences of intensifying rice production in Cambodia. It has also produced critical new information on groundwater availability in Cambodia.

WWF partners and the Greater Mekong Programme have confirmed that the research will contribute to the body of evidence on the negative impacts of mainstem damming of the Mekong River. The project has provided LHI Fellow, Kien van Nguyen, a platform for continued professional and academic development that supports his ongoing engagement with provincial governments and local communities on the sustainable development of the Mekong Delta. He has also been able to network with like-minded individuals in Cambodia identified through the LHI Linked Indicators for Vital Ecosystem Services (LIVES) project.

One expected output of the project is to obtain an environmental grant from Mitsui & Co. Ltd., to support the maintenance of floating rice, a traditional, small-scale system of rice production that uses less chemicals but generates high economic return while maintaining biodiversity in the Mekong Region.

Project partners

Australian National University (ANU), WWF, An Giang University, Luc Hoffmann Institute.

Project leaders

Dr Jamie Pittock (ANU), Stuart Orr (WWF International), Dr Marc Goichot (WWF Greater Mekong), Dr Kien van Nguyen (ANU/An Giang University, Vietnam), Dr Louise Gallagher (Universty of Geneva).

Project development

The project proposal was received from WWF International and ANU in 2013/2014. It was evaluated and recommended by a WWF panel before being accepted into the LHI portfolio.

Start date: 1 December 2014

End date: 31 December 2016

Related reading

Shared risk – key to guiding action on water, food and energy

Blog post: Floating rice – lessons from the Mekong

Bassi, A. and Gallagher, L. (2016) Integrated Economic and Spatial Planning for the Food-Energy-Water Nexus. In Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Policy for Sustainability (pp. 54-73). IGI Global.