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Innovative business models for life on earth

With more and more companies striving for impact, and non-profit organisations seeking more sustainable revenue models, the lines between the business and non-profit sector are blurring. What new sustainable business models will emerge for non-profits and impact-driven enterprises to deliver lasting and effective impact?

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Drawing from new ideas and new networks that grew out of a November 2018 convening, the Luc Hoffmann Institute has begun incubating a number of initiatives that make use of innovative business models to deliver environmental gains. The institute is always scouting for bright minds and ideas, and helps connect new approaches together. With its incubation model, the institute works with innovators in both non-profits and impact-driven enterprises to transform good ideas into concrete solutions for nature and people.

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Ideation

November 2018

The Luc Hoffmann Institute publishes a thought piece by Judith Sanderse, PhD candidate

New horizons for non-profit business models

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November 2018

The Luc Hoffmann Institute facilitates a convening on innovative business models for non-profits and social enterprise.

Incubation

September 2019

The Luc Hoffmann Institute engages with and challenges innovators directly at the Business of Conservation Conference in Africa. Ideas and leads are gathered to include in an upcoming analysis publication.

Aspiration

A new generation of sustainability-minded entrepreneurs emerges and fundamentally transforms the way society values and conserves nature.

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Related Reading

Diversifying local livelihoods while sustaining wildlife
– A January 2020 Luc Hoffmann Institute analysis publication of over 130 incentives for community-based conservation.

New horizons for non-profit business models
– thought piece by Judith Sanders, PhD candidate

Wanted: disruptive entrepreneurs for conservation
– thought piece by Adrian Dellecker, Head of Strategy and Development (ad-interim), Luc Hoffmann Institute

Looking beyond hunting and tourism for community benefits
– A thought piece by Melissa de Kock; WWF-Norway, Senior Advisor: Conservation, Climate and Communities

From crisis to solutions for communities and African conservation (commentary)
– A May 2020 commentary by Dickson Kaelo, Daniel Sopia, Damian Bell, Richard Diggle and Fred Nelson on the Mongabay website

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Biodiversity Revisited

If the decline in biodiversity is a problem, why have efforts to conserve it been ineffective? Is there a more inherent problem in how ‘biodiversity’ is conceptualised and managed that undermines actions? Biodiversity Revisited is the first comprehensive review of the concepts, narratives, governance, science, systems and futures underpinning biodiversity science since the emergence of the term in the 1980s. The initiative aspires to spark, in future generations of researchers – a new and more interdisciplinary set of pathways for research toward regenerating just and diverse life on Earth.

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Ideation

2018

“What’s wrong with biodiversity?”

The Biodiversity Revisited idea is born.

Incubation

Late 2018 – early 2019

The team, governance, themes and approach to Biodiversity Revisited are designed.

February 2019

A robust governance is put in place for oversight and the #BiodiversityRevisited conversation thread is born on social media

March 2019

Cambridge consultation: first response to the Biodiversity Revisited proposition from an international test group of early-career and diverse professionals

May 2019

“Biodiversity Revisited is an exciting project. It offers an urgently needed opportunity to reframe the research agenda and the debate. In a time of growing global commitment to action for nature, it could not be more timely,”
says Jim Leape, William and Eva Price Senior Fellow at Stanford Woods, Institute for the Environment; Co-director, Center for Ocean Solutions.

Acceleration

September 2019

The Biodiversity Revisited Symposium takes place in Vienna, bringing together interdisciplinary thinkers including journalists and scientists from the natural and social sciences. This picture shows the early career essay competition winners who joined the symposium.

June – October 2019

The #BiodiversityRevisited conversation skyrockets on social media. Luc Hoffmann Institute Twitter followers triple from 1000 to almost 3000 followers.

The Luc Hoffmann Institute on Twitter

February 2020

A core group of 18 members of the Biodiversity Revisited initiative meets at the Rockefeller Bellagio Center to begin drafting an innovative, five-year research agenda in an environment that facilitates deep, creative thinking.

23-24 February 2020

At the World Biodiversity Forum, 20 members of the Biodiversity Revisited initiative, including many early career essay contest winners, meet at the Rockefeller Bellagio Center to advance the development of the research agenda.

11 June 2020

A panel of three emerging, cross-sectoral leaders come together virtually with Melanie Ryan, Head of Programme, to discuss the development of the Biodiversity Revisited initiative as part of the WWF Fuller Science for Nature series.

1 July 2020

The Biodiversity Revisited research and action agenda is published, rethinking the approach to biodiversity research for the coming years, with justice and diverse voices at the centre of our efforts.

Aspiration

In 2020 and beyond, fresh ideas, narratives and engaged networks transform into action through research, policy and practice for nature and people. Networks of engaged partners and participants start to embed the Biodiversity Revisited story, ideas and new framings into their activities of teaching, sharing knowledge and designing global networks and projects for research.

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Project resources

Research Agenda
On 1 July 2020, the Biodiversity Revisited research and action agenda was published. A culmination of the two-year Biodiversity Revisited collaboration, the agenda charts a course for more effective biodiversity research and action for the next five years and beyond, putting justice at the centre of our efforts.

Fuller Seminar
In June 2020, a panel of three emerging, cross-sectoral leaders came together virtually with Melanie Ryan, Head of Programme, to discuss the development of the Biodiversity Revisited initiative as part of the WWF Fuller Science for Nature series.

Seeds of Change
A February 2020 compilation of provocative essays that formed the basis of the discussions at the Biodiversity Revisited Symposium in September 2019, Seeds of Change explores new concepts, narratives, science, governance and systems for a diverse and just future for life on Earth.

Biodiversity Revisited website 
A bespoke website by and for the initiative.

Biodiversity revisited – Biodiversity accelerated
A March 2019 thought piece by Jon Hutton, Director at the Luc Hoffmann Institute.

The power of gathering
A September 2019 thought piece by Melanie Ryan, Head of Programme (ad-interim) at the Luc Hoffmann Institute.

Snippets from the Biodiversity Revisited Symposium
Short video interviews on the future of biodiversity with a few participants from the 11-13 September 2019 Biodiversity Revised Symposium.

Putting back what we’ve taken from the world’s forests
An independent thought piece brought to you by Colin Chapman (a Professor at George Washington University) and Claire Hemingway (a Program Officer at the National Science Foundation).

Blinded by our heroic fantasies?
An independent thought piece brought to you by Josie Chambers, a postdoc at Cambridge University and the Luc Hoffmann Institute.

Is what we’re doing working?
An independent thought piece brought to you by Victoria Pilbeam, a Senior Consultant at Clear Horizon Consulting.

Bridging aspirations and biodiversity conservation
An independent thought piece brought to you by Dr Santiago Izquierdo-Tort, a Consultant at Natura y Ecosistemas Mexicanos and a Senior Researcher at ITAM Centre for Energy. and Natural Resources.

When is growth good enough?
An independent thought piece brought to you by Natalie Knowles, a PhD Candidate at the University of Waterloo.

Does extinction matter?
An independent thought piece by Dr Niki Rust, a StrategicCommunications Adviser at the Luc Hoffmann Institute.

The concept of ‘palimpsest’ to reorient biodiversity
An independent thought piece brought to you by Tlacaelel Rivera Núñez.

Perceiving the livingscapes we are within
An independent thought piece brought to you by Madhurya Balan, Collaborator at The Forest Way.

Biotic diversity revisited
An independent thought piece by Daniel P. Faith of the Australian Museum Research Institute in Sydney, Australia.

Revisiting biodiversity in a village of mixed perspectives
An independent thought piece by Carina Wyborn and Jasper Montana.

An Open Letter to Conservation
An independent thought piece by Elliot Connor, founder of Human Nature.

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Navigating conflict over iconic wildlife

How can we better ensure that neither biodiversity conservation nor livelihoods are negatively impacted by conflicts over iconic wildlife? As human populations expand and natural habitats shrink, people and wildlife increasingly clash over food and habitat. These interactions drive conflicts between different interest groups with strongly held positions, creating some of the most intractable conservation challenges. Working to address deep-seated human-wildlife conflicts requires innovative ideas and  approaches.

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To safeguard species and community livelihoods, the institute is working with Griffith University, the University of Aberdeen and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Species Survival Commission (IUCN-SSC) Human-Wildlife Conflict Task Force to create an overarching standard for addressing conflicts over biodiversity.

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Ideation

2018

The Luc Hoffmann Institute, together with Griffith University, hold workshops to formulate a vision of “institutionalised good governance in human-wildlife coexistence in wildlife conservation”.

Incubation

2019

The Luc Hoffmann Institute commissions a systems analysis study on “The state of knowledge and practice on human-wildlife conflicts”, driving exploration on a global standard.

2019

The Luc Hoffmann Institute and Griffith University convene stakeholders and community groups in Namibia and introduce an innovative approach to discussing and solving conflicts.

Acceleration

March 2020

The Luc Hoffmann Institute issues a new analysis on ‘The state of knowledge and practice on human-wildlife conflicts’. Compiled by leading specialists in the field of HWC, it points the way to developing a standard to guide and improve approaches to HWC globally.

The surprising new way to approach human-wildlife conflict: a new report

Aspiration

2020 and beyond

This initiative functions as the nucleus around which a consensus for the value of a standard can form between academics, conservation practitioners, and communities. The strong relationships that have been forged with key actors and the Namibia pilot will have paved the way for accelerated progress towards funding for the creation and uptake of a global standard.

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Why we need a new process to navigate conflicts over iconic wildlife 
An April 2019 thought piece by Duan Biggs, Senior Research Fellow at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.